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25 Insanely Creative Infographic Designs to Inspire You

Are you using infographics within your business? You should be.

Infographics are a unique and creative form of data visualization. They allow you to present information that may otherwise appear too complicated (or boring!) in an engaging and understandable way.

90% of the information transmitted to our brain is visual, and processed 60,000x faster than text alone, so infographics are a proven way to get vital information in front of your audience. 

Successful infographics allow the target viewer to scan and absorb information much faster than scrolling through a website or document, meaning your data is much more likely to make an impact.

Before we get into our list of 25 insanely creative infographic designs to inspire your next creation, here are some key things to keep in mind when designing an infographic:

  1. Keep it simple – both in design and the statistics you include
  2. Use relevant visuals – only use graphics and illustrations that will backup your information
  3. Personalize your graphics – include branded and custom icons over stock vectors
  4. Create a story – create a path for the viewer to follow, with a clear start and end point

Now for some inspiration!

Tech’s bizarre beginnings & lucrative pivots by Visual Capitalist

This interesting infographic shares the somewhat unknown beginnings of some of the world’s leading tech brands using hand-drawn elements and handwritten fonts. 

How to enjoy studying by Ivy Panda

The graphics and illustrations in this simple infographic add to the information rather than distract from it, by clearly visualizing what each section is about.

REI mailer by John Devolle

Infographics don’t need to have a multitude of colors, as this creative example shows. Using two shades of one color makes the information easy to navigate, and variations in the typography add texture and depth.

DIY Green Tea Face Mask – Design Force Team

This infographic by our Design Force design team shows the breadth of data that can be shared in this format, by visualizing the steps to making your own face mask. There’s a clear visual route for the viewer to take created by the fluid green line, and photographs add a twist of interest.

Mark Cuban’s 12 rules for startups – via Entrepreneur

Each rule has been clearly sectioned in a color-blocked list format in this infographic shared by Entrepreneur, making the information bitesize and easily scannable.  

US education vs the world – USC Rossier

The clever use of color in this design allows the viewer to easily see which figures relate to which country and follow the information down through multiple levels.

How to fight hunger – USAid

This design highlights the keywords, hunger, and fight, in contrasting colors throughout to drive the message home. Vital facts are simplified and demonstrated with illustrations.

Why we’re all TED Heads – TED Talks

TED Talks is the most popular lecture platform across the world, and this infographic highlights its development since its inception. Quotes draw in the eye, along with bold headings and simple vector icons.  

A Typical Day for US Listeners – Spotify

Music streaming platform Spotify has used this infographic to share the listening habits of their customers and generate shareable content. They’ve used their signature font throughout for instant brand recognition.

This design gamifies information and presents a recipe journey with characters, ladders, numbered instructions and key details highlighted with custom icons.

The Decentralized Content Marketing Playbook – HubSpot

CRM and Marketing giant HubSpot uses different types of graphs, charts, and timelines in variable directions to share statistics on marketing habits. 

Social Media for B2B in 2016 – Real Business Rescue

The use of geometric shapes in this infographic breaks up the information and leads the eye down the page. It’s bold, clear, and contains only the most important and interesting information.

The Economics of Going Green – Visual.ly for the Huffington Post

To illustrate the true cost of renewable energy, this infographic uses bold numbers and simple icons to visually explain facts and figures. Repeating leaf icons throughout create continuity and instantly show that this has an environmental theme.

A perspective of time – Wait But Why x Visual.ly

This infographic uses plenty of negative space, a smooth color gradient, and contrasting icons to help the viewer put their 24 hour day into perspective against the timeline of the entire universe. 

A Brief History Of Atomic Theory – Futurism

This bold and clear design uses two primary colors and two secondary/accent colors to make the information pop. Who knew quantum mechanics could be so simple?

Orchestrate a Solid AMB Team – Marketo

Learn how to bring together the most effective marketing team in this fun, orchestra-inspired infographic. Using animation to add movement, this infographic comes to life and makes a regular topic more engaging and inspiring. 

Infographic elements – 123RF

123RF has used an infographic to present the many different elements you can use in an infographic! This is a great example of how maps, charts, and graphs can be easily understood, thanks to a simple complementary color palette. 

Building the City of the Future – Jing Zhang for Hewlett Packard Enterprise

After a strong introduction to explain the information, the focus of this infographic is the detailed graphic illustrations. There’s a clear directional flow accented with arrows, and text is kept to a minimum.

Creative resume – Paiheme Studio, Pierre-Marie Postel

An anime theme and monotone palette make this infographic-based resume instantly appealing. The unique illustrations tell the story of the designer while emphasizing the key information with bold typography in both English and Japanese characters.

When two flags become one – Graphisme

Using Venn diagrams, this infographic clearly explains how two flags can be combined to make a new flag. It features a brief introduction but allows the visuals to tell the story.

Photography infographics –  Peter Ørntoft Studio

Photography can play an exciting part in infographics as this example shows. The colors in the woman’s clothing represent the sections of a pie chart, to share key statistics and percentages.

An illustrated guide to Doctor Who – Sam Gibley

This beautifully illustrated infographic uses a radar chart to illustrate the length of time each actor played the iconic role of Doctor Who. Thin lines are used to guide the viewer to find the information needed, and the color palette is a clear reference to the branding of the show. 

An Analysis of the Beatles – Duelling Data

A fantastic example of how infographics can be interactive, this design allows the viewer to easily dissect the information by hovering over the details they wish to learn more about, like which songs were written by John Lennon!

Kobe Bryant Scoring Numbers – Lakers

Using distinct Lakers colors, purple and yellow, this infographic combines a striking black and white photograph of basketball legend Kobe Bryant, which contrasts the statistics making them clear and enticing to read. 

My Creative Process – Drishti Khemani

Last but by no means least, Dritishti’s monotone infographic shows the power of simplicity. Uniform line weight and single color make the icons and data extremely clear and easy to follow.

Are you ready to start introducing infographics into your business marketing strategy? Remember the key: infographics simplify data through visualization.

If you want to explore how infographic design services can benefit your business goals, get in touch with Design Force today to gain access to our team of world-class designers, ready to bring your statistics to life through our flexible subscription plans

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When you register for the trial project, Design Force will offer 2.5 design hours for free to provide any of the included services: social media graphics, email graphics, basic illustration, banner ad design, poster design, basic infographics, or powerpoint presentation enhancement.